Tag Archives: Sambalpur News

High-decibel DJ music disturb residents

Next time you hear music playing and blinking glittering colourful lights accompanying it, do not dare to proceed ahead and take a different route. There is every possibility that you may either go deaf or have an heart attack if you are an elderly citizen. Indifference of the police administration has left the denizens of Sambalpur getting exposed to high-decibel DJ music accompanying ‘Baaraat’ processions. And it continues to torture you even after 10 pm with the administration refusing to act on violation of noise pollution norms.

Sources said while neighbouring Bargarh has banned DJ music and other adjacent district administrations have ensured it is regulated, no step has been taken in Sambalpur to check it. The music not only leaves you disturbed but also creates ripples in household articles when it passes through streets. “The volume of the DJ is so high that the window panel gets vibrated because of the noise. The sound grows louder when night falls with traffic on the road going off. Odisha State Pollution Control Board (OSPCB) has also failed to put a check on it,” alleged a resident.

As per sub-section 29 of Pollution Control Act, 1986, there is a clear provision of noise level at different times and places of the day. While in industrial areas, the noise level should not exceed 75 decibel, it should be 55 decibel in commercial areas and 45 decibel in residential areas. The OSPCB is responsible to measure the noise level and any violation can be intimated to the police, who in turn will initiate action. But with majority of Kalyan Mandaps and Marriage Halls located in residential areas in Sambalpur city, high-decibel sound continues to haunt denizens. There has been no instance of administration taking action over violation of the provision.

Assistant Environmental Scientist of OSPCB S N Nanda said they can only measure noise level and intimate the administration, if directed. Similarly, Sambalpur Sadar SDPO, Mihir Panda, admitted that there is a direction of both the Supreme Court and the High Court on the noise level and that they are aware of the guidelines and its violation. He said the proposal to clamp down on such violation is under consideration along with playing music and band after 10 pm.

Senior ENT Specialist Dr Satyajit Mishra said sudden exposure to high-decibel sound leads to head reeling, dizziness and hearing loss. He said high-decibel sound during ‘Baaraat’ procession should be banned immediately. Similar ban on DJ was echoed by cardiologist Sunil Sharma, who said sudden exposure to high decibel sound causes irritation and could lead to cardiac arrest and heart attack following stress in the brain.

INTACH team discovers 9th Century Nataraj Idol in Sambalpur

Ancient stone sculpture Nataraj IdolThe discovery of a Nataraj Idol at Bandhapara of Durgapali village here belonging to ninth century has triggered interest among intellectuals as the history of the region between seventh and fourteenth centuries is silent.

Sambalpur Collector Samarth Verma thanked the Indian National Trust on Arts, Culture and Heritage (INTACH) team which discovered the statue during a survey at the site Wednesday. He said it is a prizes possession for the proposed Sambalpur museum. The statue has been kept in the district culture office as the proposed museum is under renovation now.

The Victoria town hall building, currently under renovation, will be converted into a museum that will house such artifacts.
Verma said he is trying to rope in experts in the fields of history, culture and archeology for identification of the statue.

Historian Deepak Panda said his team was making some inquiries Wednesday at Durgapali village. He said Brundaban Pandey alias Aditya, the priest of nearby Vanadurga temple, informed them that a broken statue was found at the top of a heap of soil. He took the team to the spot.

Aditya said there are many more historical artifacts kept at a nearby Shiva temple. Deepak said the team has found a unique statue. Only a small portion of the statue was visible on the surface. He thanked local people for helping the team retrieve the statue.
The statue was found on the top of a soil heap close to a pond known as Devibandh at Bandhapara in Durgapali village. There are three more historical ponds known as Shankarbandh, Puranbandh and Kalibandh in the locality.
Deepak said he immediately informed the Collector about the finding with a request to send a JCB machine to the spot. The statue was too heavy to be lifted by hands. It weighed more than two quintals.

He said the statue and a crown of some broken temple made from khandolite stone were brought from the spot to the district culture office. They initially presumed it to be a statue of Goddess Durga as it has ten hands with several objects spread around the body. But later, it was found to be a Nataraj statue as there is a crescent moon on the top of its head besides Ganga flowing from there. The statue is in the form of a dancing Shiva.

He said the statue might have been vandalised as its face is laced with chisel marks and the left leg is broken from its knee. It seems some invaders might have destroyed the statue along with the temple. Deepak said research on the statue may throw light on the historical nature of the deity.

April 18th will be the Certificate Day for Sambalpur University

April 18 will be Sambalpur University’s certificate distribution day when the varsity will hand over around 75,000 certificates to the degree and diploma holders of various colleges affiliated to it.

Graduates of Sambalpur university have not received their degrees and diplomas certificates since 2013 despite convocations being held every year to issue certificates.

The news of the huge backlog came to limelight after the joining of Deepak Behera as vice-chancellor in January. It has been alleged that former vice-chancellors Bishnu Charan Barik and Chitta Ranjan Tripathy did not take interest in distributing certificates.

Bhutan team is in Sambalpur for Buddhist link

A four-member team from Bhutan led by Jigme Choden of National Library and Archives of Bhutan under Ministry of Home and Cultural Affairs visited Sambalpur Friday. Other members of the team were Gympo Tsherung, Yonten Dargyl and Lama Tashi Norbu.

The four-member team from Bhutan were in search of the history of ‘Sambhala’, the earlier name of Sambalpur that existed almost 2,000 years ago.

The team visited Odisha to trace the origin of Uddiyana and Sambhala. After visiting several places in and around Bhubaneswar to get clues of these words, they came to Sambalpur. They met local historian Deepak Panda and discussed with him about the historical background of Sambalpur, particularly traces of Buddhism.

They visited several places here including Dhanukosha, the birthplace of Mahapadmasambhava. It is said Dhanupali was derived from the word Dhanukosha.

Speaking to Orissa POST Saturday, Panda said as per Buddhist texts, King Indrabhuti, who propounded Mahayana sect of Buddhism, was the king of Sambhala in Uddiyana during 7th century AD.

Legends have it that the king had no son. He adopted a son, who was found on a lotus in the middle of Dhanukosha, a large water body. This event took place after a series of droughts. His brilliant son became famous in history in the name of Padmasambhava.

He said Padmasambhava achieved the status of a great master (Guru) after meditation and penance. He went to Tibet on invitation by the then king of Tibet and established Lama cult there and became known as ‘Buddha the Second’. He said Dhanukosh was the pond where the lotus blossomed with Padmasambhava in it. In due course of time, Danukosh became Dhanupali, a locality in Sambalpur.

Panda said there used to be a huge water body in Dhanukosha or Dhanupali area. It shrank and dried in course of time. A great saint came to Sambalpur in 1805 who could know the significance of the place. He started meditating with dhuni (making smoke) at that place. Then Queen Ratna Kumari built a mutt for him and this mutt is known as Rani Mutt. One can still find a vast dry water body here.

He said the Bhutanese team collected many references on the ancient scriptures mentioning Uddiyana and Sambhala. They went to Sonepur the neighborhood district headquarters. It was earlier known as Swarnapuri. Lakhmikara, sister of Indrabhuti was married to Seol, son of King Jalendra of Swarnapuri. Lakhmikara established Tantrayana or Sahayajana sect in Buddhism.

The visiting team said they need more proof about Uddiyana. If it is established, it will be a famous tourist hub and there will be a large inflow of tourists to Orissa, particularly to Sambalpur.

“Sauchamukta Mahanadi Abhiyan” launched by SMC

Sauchamukta Mahanadi AbhiyanThe Sambalpur Municipal Corporation (SMC) on Saturday launched ‘Sauchamukta Mahanadi Abhiyan’ to make banks of the river flowing along Ring Road in the city open defecation-free (ODF).Launching the campaign near Samaleswari temple, Collector Samarth Verma said awareness drive will be conducted in the localities situated along the Ring Road. He said a campaign vehicle will move on the Ring Road from Sunday to create awareness on not to defecate in open along the banks of Mahanadi.

The drive will continue for a period of one month and fine will be imposed on the violators. The best locality for maintaining the area ODF will be awarded. Similarly, around 11 community toilets have been constructed along the Ring Road and one can use the toilet free of cost, he added.He also urged the residents to help make Sambalpur green and clean city.

ToiletThe launching saw different cultural programmes to create awareness on the issue.

It has also been seen that people from well off families residing in the localities along the Ring Road have toilets in their homes but prefer to defecate along the banks of Mahanadi. And because of open defecation, the breeze blowing from the river stinks adding to the pollution. With the Ring Road being widened and beautified, the SMC is making sincere efforts to improve the sanitation along the bank of the river which has the potential to draw crowd during evenings.